Mosquito Removal

If you’re noticing small, red, itchy bites on your arms after spending time outside in the yard, it is likely mosquitoes have bitten you. Currently, there are 176 species of mosquitoes within the United States. Mosquitoes are insects that are associated with the fly family. During the day, mosquitoes avoid warm areas and seek shelter in cool, wet places around your home such as in birdbaths, gutters, and ponds. As the sun begins to set, mosquitoes become active and will travel during the night in search of food. Contrary to belief, mosquitoes do not feed off of blood. They feed upon nectar and plant juices, but primarily seek blood from mammals in order to reproduce. Once a mosquito has bitten a mammal, it sucks blood through its proboscis or nose, which is then taken back to the nest to initiate reproduction.

Merlin’s Mosquito Removal

In the beginning of spring, when much rainfall occurs, mosquitoes typically hatch their first set of eggs. Rain showers typically induce egg hatching and several hundred eggs are laid at a time in standing water. As more and more mosquitoes reproduce in a given area, they become annoying and disturbing pests. Families begin noticing mosquitoes inside the home and try to use do-it-yourself mosquito spray that does not work.

The best way to eliminate and deter mosquitoes from your property is by professional mosquito control. Since mosquitoes are often a reoccurring problem for many New Jersey homeowners, we have developed indoor and outdoor mosquito treatments to eliminate adult mosquitoes as well as their eggs. Our specialists will first begin treatment by assessing your home or property for areas of standing water for this attracts mosquitoes. We suggest routine maintenance for gutters and birdbaths, but we understand that ponds are homes to fish and other underwater creatures. For this reason, we offer a unique water-based mosquito deterrent that will not contaminate pond water and is considerate of underwater life.

For effective mosquito control, call Merlin’s today.